Youth Polytechnic Students’ Perception of Vocational Training in Nakuru County

IEA Kenya, CTL and CEDGG

Youth Polytechnic Students’ Perception of Vocational Training in Nakuru County    File Size: 0 kB Downloads: 21
Post Date:
29 November 2017

The objective of this study is to create a foundation for quality service delivery in Technical and Vocational Education and Training in the County of Nakuru through the assessment of students’ satisfaction at polytechnics in the County. The study was designed for a thorough and detailed work to be conducted towards the development of an invaluable document not only for the target polytechnics and the County of Nakuru, but also for other polytechnics and educational institutions in Kenya. The outcome would therefore, be useful to TVET institutions in Kenya to continuously improve the quality of services rendered to students and enhance quality teaching and learning services delivered.


Effect of Elections on Kenya’s Economy

IEA Kenya

Effect of Elections on Kenya’s Economy    |   File Size: 189 kB Downloads: 640   |   Post Date: 02 November 2017

The periods that precede elections in Kenya have often been characterized by high intensity campaigns. As a consequence, greater focus during this period has mostly been on political communication that is unrelated to the real policy challenges that the country is faced with. Coupled with the recent history, this period causes anxiety to Kenyan citizens and economic actors who think that this pre-election period exposes Kenya’s fragility.


Are Private Sustainability Standards Obstacles To, Or Enablers of, SME Participation in Value Chains?

Global Economic Governance and IEA Kenya

Are Private Sustainability Standards Obstacles To, Or Enablers of, SME Participation in Value Chains?    |   File Size: 0 kB Downloads: 36   |   Post Date: 16 October 2017

This discussion paper examines the roles of South Africa and Kenya as regional gateways for global value chains (GVCs) coordinated by multinational corporations (MNCs), and the obstacles small and medium enterprises (SMEs) face in entering those value chains, owing to the voluntary sustainability standards (VSS) enacted by MNCs. As SMEs play a significant role in the formal and informal sector, both of which are crucial to the two countries’, and their neighbours’, economies, integrating them successfully holds developmental gains. 


Informing the approach of multilateral development banks to use of country systems

Global Economic Governance and IEA Kenya

Informing the approach of multilateral development banks to use of country systems    |   File Size: 0 kB Downloads: 42   |   Post Date: 02 October 2017

Most countries consider infrastructure development as a key enabler of development, as it spurs job creation, trade and investment. For many developing countries, multilateral development banks (MDBs) are important in addressing their infrastructure financing deficits. MDBs have historically dictated the terms of financing by prescribing rules on financial management and environmental and social safeguards, despite the presence of similar systems in the relevant countries. Increasingly, however, both MDBs and their borrowers are seeking to eliminate such extra requirements in favour of the full utilisation of countries’ own domestic systems and processes, broadly referred to as the ‘use of country systems’ (UCS). The defining benefit of greater UCS to MDBs is that it respects the sovereignty of countries by not imposing external conditionalities. UCS also promotes national ownership of development projects by increasing the involvement of domestic actors, institutions and processes, and hence increasing projects’ sustainability. At the same time, UCS can strengthen domestic systems through greater utilisation, thereby exposing deficiencies that can be corrected and eliminating the duplication of costs and efforts engendered by parallel systems. Ultimately, UCS gives developing countries a greater stake in their own development trajectory, as well as the tools to manage the process better. Yet the greater uptake of an UCS approach by MDBs and borrowers has been hampered by a number of key challenges.


Enhancing Mobilization of Own Source Revenue In Nairobi City County: Issues & Opportunities

IEA Kenya

Enhancing Mobilization of Own Source Revenue In Nairobi City County: Issues & Opportunities    File Size: 0 kB Downloads: 184
Post Date:
01 August 2017

This paper seeks to understand the challenges and opportunities of enhancing local revenue mobilization in Nairobi City County. It notes that local revenue is an important revenue source for the County given its expanding budgetary and service delivery needs. Furthermore, Nairobi County has little influence on the revenue it receives as transfers from the national government and that in cases of delays, local revenue is always a good fall back. Besides, local revenue is critical in fostering accountability and fiscal discipline in the county.


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Recent Posts

Youth Polytechnic Students’ Perception of Vocational Training in Nakuru County.

Effect of Elections on Kenya’s Economy.

Are Private Sustainability Standards Obstacles To, Or Enablers of, SME Participation in Value Chains?.

Informing the approach of multilateral development banks to use of country systems.

Enhancing Mobilization of Own Source Revenue In Nairobi City County: Issues & Opportunities.

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